“If you’re a fan of 45, swipe left.” “If you call yourself liberal, move along.” “If you don’t vote, then you won’t get a date with me.” We see things like this all the time in online dating profiles, especially these days. But should you put your political preferences in the profile? And if so, is there a way to do that without sounding negative? Erika and Chris talk politics this week — the dos, the don’ts, the rights, the lefts, and everything in between.¬†

If you’re thinking about having a long-distance relationship, there are many factors that come into play, but the most important by far is each participant’s willingness to try. In this week’s¬†episode, we re-share one of Erika’s craziest online dating stories (think OkCupid, Florida, sarcasm, and toilets), and then Erika and Chris discuss what it means to connect with someone who doesn’t live nearby. In the end, is a simple conversation always worth it? That’s in the eye of the dater.¬†

Oh, that pesky thing we call expectations. Many people go online to find “the one,” or at least a long-term partner. That goal is fine, of course. But what’s not fine is measuring “success” to that standard, much of which is not in our control. Online dating is not a spouse-finder, soulmate producer, or magic wand; it is simply a tool, or vehicle — much like the gym — that is available for use in order to meet people. With this tool still comes work, time, and personal accountability. And each and every date you go on is part of the process and the journey… so don’t discount that.¬†

Have you¬†ever been on a date, and it seems like the person you’re out with has no idea who you are? Maybe they ask you questions that were already answered in your profile, or maybe they overlooked¬†a dealbreaker in the profile. Whatever it is, it can get awkward! This week, Erika and Chris re-share some stories about dates gone wrong simply because the other person neglected to re-read (or read in the first place) what you had written.